Our highly specialized team of dermatologists offers complete care and performs a wide variety of procedures for all types of skin conditions. We offer the least invasive, most effective procedures, including cryosurgery (liquid nitrogen to remove noncancerous and cancerous lesions), shave biopsy, and precise Mohs surgery.

Mohs Micrographic Surgery

We use this surgery approach to treat and cure different skin cancers, including basal cell carcinoma, melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and Paget's disease.

If skin cancer is on an area of the body where it is important to remove as little tissue as possible — such as the nose, eyelids, or hands — Mohs surgery can be a good option.

During Mohs surgery, the dermatologist removes the smallest amount of tissue possible. The cancer is removed in layers until the cancer is gone. You usually will have a smaller scar than you would with other treatment options.

This procedure is time-consuming and often can take the entire day to perform. The cure rate is very high for treating skin cancer — 99% of first-time skin cancers, and up to 97% of skin cancers that have come back are cured.

Other Dermatology Procedures

At Tower Health, we use the least invasive approaches when possible. If more advanced surgeries are needed, you can trust our expertise.

Cryosurgery

Cryosurgery uses extremely cold liquid nitrogen that is applied directly to the tissue with a cotton swab or spray device. Your dermatologist will use cryosurgery to destroy abnormal tissue, precancerous skin growths, or early-stage tumors on the skin.

Excision

A surgical excision, also known as shave excision, is used to remove skin lesions, moles, and skin tumors. At Tower Health, our dermatologists use shave excision to remove certain types of skin cancers such as squamous cell carcinomas, basal cell carcinomas, melanomas, or skin lesions such as lumps and sores.

Dermatologists perform shave excision in the doctor’s office. The skin area is numbed, and the dermatologist uses a small blade to remove the skin's outermost layer.